Skip to main content

Full text of "The Golden Bull"

See other formats


,^< 



i' M^\< 




j^ 



m 



mm 




M 

^^^^' 






m^ 



m 






// ■ I 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://www.archive.org/details/goldenbull1936john 




THE BULL 

1936 




Copyright 
1936 

Clarence Turner 
Editor-in-Chief 



Herbert Reid 

Bur,tnes.s Manager 




THE 1936 BULL 



VOLUME V 



PUBLISHED BY THE JUNIOR COLLEGE CLASS 

of 

JOHNSON C. SMITH UNIVERSITY 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



L. fUbc 1936 131111 




FOREWORD 

The nineteen hundred thirty-six BULL 
Staff has worked diligently in the production 
of this, the Fifth Edition of the BULI.. m 
order that the memories of our Alumni may 
he freshened with current tacts, that our own 
pleasant days may he ea.'iily referred to in 
days to come, and that ncic individuals may 
he attracted to our icondcrt ul Institution. 



Page Four 



Ik. Cfte 1936 TBull 




CONTENTS 



ADMINISTRATION 



CLASSES 



ORGANIZATIONS 



ATHLETICS 



FEATURES 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Page Five 



me 1936 leuii 




DBDICA T ION 

To 

Mrs. 11. I.. McCrorhy 

Wife of Our Beloved I^resulenl 



Page Six 



^ C1)C 1936 -IBuII A 




President Henry Lawrence McCrorey 
A.B., S.T.B., D.D.. LL.D. 



Page Seven 



€bt 1936 T5un 





U^Tk 



ALUMNI 



(^ James Egert Allex ■lel'Xevv York. X. Y. A sketch of Mr. Allen's wo 

^ Miss., for several years follows: 1922 — Graduate work at City College of New ' 
1924 — Organized the Smith Club of New York and served as president for sevc 
in New York public schools: 1932 — One of the twelve Negroes appointed by 
on the George Washington Bi-Centennial Committee of New York._ At present 
Smith Club; member of the Board of Managers and Ch; 
Y. M. C. A.; president of New York Branch of N. A. A 



Chapter of John Brown Memorial Asso< 
Psi Fraternity; Contributor to several 
in journalism; member of several civic 
and is the son of Rev. E. \V. Allen wh 

Dr. C. E. Bo.M.Mi 'lo, Orangj 
He enjoys a lucrative practice. 



, after teaching in Okolona. 
rk and Columbia University; 
years; 192.=> — Began teaching 
avor J. J. Walker to serve 
Treasurer of the New York 
f Boys' Work Committee of the l.'.ith Street 
th term): president of Frederick Dougla 



He 



Dr. Bo 
nber 



W. H. Carroll '96, Monticel 
of Monticello Academy, Monticello 
he received his trainina yithin he 



.. Ark; 

Ark. He has served thi 
his trainins^i 
Chisol.m 'MTNewark. New Jersey 
for several years. The tine type of work he is doing reflects credi 
saying that he is one of "J. C. S. U.'s loyal sons." 

B. F. .McDowell '72, Greenville, South Carolina. Dr. McD. 
Ministry by Catawba Presbytery in 1879. He has served as pastor 
Church and School. Greenvile. S. C, twenty-seven and one-half yea 
comprising Walker's Church. Reidville. S. C. and Bowers Church, 
and Bowers twenty-two years or more. He served as Stated Clerk 



1 Polemarch of North-West District of Kappa Alpha 
nd papers, and recipient of several prizes for excellency 
roups in Harlem. .Mr. Allen is a loyal alumnus of the University, 
is also an alumnus ot the Vniversity. 

Jersey. Dr. C. E. Bomar is a prominent dentist in Orange, N. J. 
lar keeps in touch with his alma mater and is interested in all of 
of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity. 



nagazn 



practicing medicine 
on the University. 



in Newark, N. 
We take pride 



3well was ordained to the Presbyterian 
and teacher at the Mattooit Presbyterian 
rs. He was Stated Supply for the field 
Wellford. S. C— Walker's twentv years, 
of McClelland Presbvtery for thirty-six 




Page Eight 



Clje 1936 iBull A 



^ 



y 




Dr 



ES H. Silt 



department 
the public s 
School for s 



tv of Chaivm 
nher of the ; 
IE '98, Char 
that time he 
?s in Gastoiii; 
ing the same 



of the 



.Natural Scit 
Alpha Frati 
th Carolina. 



nd Head of the Depar 
uated fr 



rhool for Neg 

;ven years. D 

In 1907 he h 
and Latin in the high school department 
for setting up the present library under 
in the Theological Seminary; in 1934 



Sllute graduated from the Theological 
nd church atTairs. Dr. Shute organized 
. N. C.. and served in the capacity of principal of Highland High 
ime he built and served as pastor of the Presbyterian church in that 
tor in the English department here at S " ' 
t the same time serving as librarian. W< 
modern system of libra, y management^ 
made dean of the Theologi 



He ha 



of the Ge 



later he taught Greek 
• indebted to Dr. Shute 
19.i2 he began teaching 
iry. For a number of 
:ral Alumni Association 
ssioner at the General 
against the Synod 



Shute 



Edgai 



Smith 
jshingto 



extensii 



capacity 



aptist 
iiidav 
1903 



years he served as secretary to the college fa 

for the past eighteen years. He represented the Presbytery of Catawba as v 
Assembly twice — at St. Louis and at San Francisco. In 1934 when complaint 
at Catawba he went to Cleveland, Ohio, as counselor of the Synod of Catawba, 
graduate work at Columbia University. We are proud of the fact that Dr. Shute 
and we are equally proud that we have him with us in the Theological Seminary. 

John Edg.\r Smith 'g", Washington, District of Columbia. Captain John 
a monotype (typesetting machine) operator in the Government Printing Office 
thirty-six years. This fact is reason enough for Smith to be proud of him. He also serves in the 
secretary of the Board of Trustees of his Alma .Mater. 

Marshall A. Tallev '04, Indianapolis, Indiana. Kev. Talley is the pastor of the .Mount 
Church in Indianapolis, Indiana. He is editor of the AiiM Quarterly and dean of the Natii 
School and B. Y. P. U. Congress. Rev. Talley has written A Socratic Exposition of Gcnc.u 
he was varsity debater and president of his class and secretary of the Y. M. C. A. in 1904. he has kept 
in touch with his Alma Mater since his graduation. 
V, Yancv M. Thompson '16, Newark, New Jersey. Matriculated at Johnson C. Smith in 1912. He won the 

/Annual Gold Medal Prize given by the Alumni Association and was an active member of the Mattoon Litera.y 
Society, member of the Literary Research Circle, and the Y. M. C. A.. He has, since his graduation from 
Smith, received subsequent training in many other institutions. A sketch of his work follows: 1918-1924 — 
Organized the Trinity Mission Presbyterian Church at Bloomfield, New Jersey; 1924-1928— Pastored Grace 
Presbvterian Church and served as Staff Director of education and recreation for the Gary Neighborhood 
House, Gary, Indiana; 192.S.1934-— Served as Supply Minister at the Christ Church, Orange, N. J., and was 
special Parole Officer through the Juvenile Court of Essex County and was acting as social adjuster for the 
Juvenile Delinquents of Essex County; 1934-1935— Was supervisor of the Negro Vocational Survey, 
division. Department of Institutions and Agencies at Trenton, N. J.; 193.S— Supervised on the F'edei 
pational Classification Project for the Works Progress Administration; 193.1-1936 — Special Interview! 
Clinic for Venereal Disease Department. Author of articles, "How to Run a Church School," 
Elementary Teacher, Boston, Mass. 
SJoHN H. Toatlev '16, Due West, South Carolina. Rev. Toatley is the efficient pastor of the 
-ehtirch in Due West, S. C. He is also the principal of the Lincoln High School of the sam 
Toatley is a loyal alumnus of Smith. 

- " ■■• ■--. Washington. District of Columbia. Mr. Willian ' , ■ ..- 

postal clerk for many years. He is active in fraternal circles and a loyal 
proud. 

> I George L. Winstead '03, Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania. Dr. Winstead has 

l/I'ennsylvania. He has done the type of work that reflects credit to this 

"with pride in that he received his early training within her walls. 



of Smith— o 



al Occi 

r in tl- 

• Pilgrii 

ity. Re- 
apacity of 




Page Nine 



L etc 1936 T3uII 



aima iilater 



jTirm ag t|)e fjillg Uiijereon tf)p Uiallsi arise, 
^otuering in faeautp toluarb tfjc loftp sifeics, 
Steadfast anb strong, illustrionfi is tbp fame, 
3fof)nson C. ^niitt). Uie proublp bail tfip name. 



ILeb tjp tfje ^oluer Uiijose luisbom is onr ligfjt. 
W\)o, ujfjile Uie strobe to scale ti)e lull's Step fngi). 
^ent noble frienbs to Ijelp us on our toap, 
^ress on, our ^mittj, still Ijigtjer bap bp bap. 

III. 

Jfair ^Ima iHater. U)l)ile tbe pears go bp, 
Ebrougb goob anb ill, Uie'll bolb tbp banner bigb- 
ZLlptoarb lue'll climb, inspireb bp tbee, 
(IDnUjarb foreUer, on to Uictorp. 

— Cji:c)1«-.i-: I.i-cinard Ai.i.i n. '26. 



Pane Tin 




OFFICERS AND 
FACULTY 



^^ull 




DhAN 'rilLOPIlILUS U. McKlNNLV 



Pagi- Twelve 



^ Cf)e 1936 IBulI A 



UNIVERSITY CORPS 



Jean Joseph Adam. b.cs-L.. Liccs-L 

A&ioctate Professor of French 



S. Herbert Adams. M.A. 

Registrar of the University. Secretary of 
Faculty, and Professor of Latin 



Russell Lloyd Anderson. S.M.. Ph.D. 

Professor of Biology and Chairman of 
Mathematics and Sciences 



Cyril Fitzgerald Atkins. S.M.. Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry 



Norman Ray Bolden. A.M. 

Associate Professor ot Economics 



Fred Weldon Bond. A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Speech 



Ulysses Simpson Brooks. SM. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Physics 



David E. Carroll. Mus.B. 

Director of Music 



Winson Cole.man. A.m. 

Associate Professor of Foreign Language 



Normal Cyril Crosby. A.M. 

Assistant Professor of History 




Page Thirteen 



L Or 1936 13iiU 



UNIVERSITY CORPS 




William Cecil Donnell. A.M. 

I'riifcssor of Education. Director at 
College and Stale Extcnaion 



R0BE:IM l.ANGHAM DOUCLASS, A.M. 
Professor of Mathematics 



Mrs. m. B. Greenlee 

Dietitian 



.losfcPH Grimes. A.M. 

Dean of Men and Associate Professor of 

Social Sciences 



PHEODUS LAEAVETTE GUNN, A.B.. B.L.S. 

Librarian and Assistant Professor of 

Bibliography 



George Thomas Kyle, A.M. 
Associate Professor of Psychology 



Tho.vias Alexander Long. A.M.. Ph.D. 

Professor of Sociology and (Chairman of 
Social Sciences 



Wendell Grant Morgan. A.M. 

Assistant to the Dean and Registrar and 
Assistant Professor of Social Sciences 



Miss C;. L. RAMSH'R 
Matron 



I MI RV LOLVELLi; RANN, SR.. A.M. 
Associate Professor of English 



Page lourleen 



^ ^t)t 1936 'JBlIll 



UNIVERSITY CORPS 



David Tobias Rav, S.M. 

Assistant Professor of Biology 



Mrs. M. K. Si'AULDIng 
Matron 



Algernon Odell Steele, A.M.. B.D. 

Assistant Professor of Religion 



Maurice Ethan Thomasson. A.M. 

Professor of Education, Associate Editor o/ 
the Quarterly Review of Higher Edu- 
cation Among Negroes 



E. French Tyson. A.B.. M.D, 

College Physician 



Arthur w. Wade. A.B. 

Secretary and Bookkeeper 



Forrest Oran Wiggins. A.M. 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 



Bertram Lawrence Woodrufe. A.M. 

Professor of English and Chairman of 

Humanities. Associate Editor of the 

Quarterly Review of Higher 

Education Among Negroes 



George Frederick Woodson, Jr., AM. 

Professor of Mathematics 




Page Fifteen 




THACHKRS' COI'I A(U-S 




SENIOR GLASS 
OFFICERS 



Reginald Hutchinson 
Ruth Hillsman 
Robert Smith 
Moses Blair 



President 

Vice-President 

Business Manager 

Secretary 



SENIORS 



o i3un 




Moses A. E. Blair 
Gastonia. N. C. 
Omega Psi Phi 

Major. Biology ami Mathematics; Secrftary of Class 
. 2. .i. 4; Unhrrsily Student Staff .!. 4; Mathematics 
hih I. 2. J. 4: Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 2, i. 4; Science 
ImIi 2. S; Alpha Kap|.a Siffma Honorary Societv i. 4. 



Bi-RNicE Blakkni;v 

Pageland. S. C. 

Maior, Rni;lish; American SocioloRical Society .■-, 4; 
Kiicli^h Philological Society i. 4; Little Theatre C.nild 
:. 1, ^". \\\ {■- A. ,;. 4: Choir .1. 4: Baskethall 4. 



Jamls T. Boyd 

Durham, N. C, 

Omeqa Psi Phi 

Major. Biology and General Science; Y. M. C. A. 
Cahinet 2; Varsity Football 1. 2. .1. 4; Varsity Basket- 
ball 1. 2. .!. 4; Co-Captain of Basketball 4; .M'ember of 
.\merican Sociological Society .!. 4; University Choir 
I. 2, .1. 4; University Quintet 1, 2. 3. 4; Student Man- 
af^er of University Quintet 4; .Secretary of \'arsity 
•S" Club 3; Le Cercle Francais 2. 



Ja.mks a. Christian 

Lumbcrton, N. C. 
Phi Beta Sigma 



History; Christi; 

ran SncioloRical .' 

,!; ^■. M. C. A. 



adcrship I'lub 1. 2. .1. 
4; Student \'olunteer 
4; ManaRcr of College 



Milton E. Cox 

Sanford. N. C. 

Kappa Alpha Psi 

. History; American Sociological Society ,!. 4; 
; Leadership Club 1. 2, i. 4; Y. M. C. A. 1. 
Link- Tlu-^ine Cuild 2. .i; N'arsily Baseball 2. ,1. 

Bi.KKV Davis 
't'oungstown, Ohio 
. M..lb.nialics; Alpha K.ippa Sigma Honorary 



Booker T. Davis 
Lancaster. S. C. 
icinlogy; American Sociological Society .>, 
Leadership Club I. 2. ,1. 4. 

CJIARLIS I'. DLSLMU'RY 

'I'oungslown. Ohio 

Omega Psi Phi 

llisloiy; Dean of l.ampa.los Club .! ; Amen- 

ol..v;ical Society .!, 4; Little Theatre Cuild 4; 

Foolb.ill 1. 2. .!, 4; Captain of Football 4; 

Haskilball 2. f; Varsity "S" Club 1, 2. .1. 4; 

.. C. 1. A. A. Annual Cimference 4; Hon- 

.11, All American Football Team 4, 



Page F.ighlecn 



Cf)e 1936 IBuII A 



Hubert A. Eaton 

Winston-Salem. N. C. 
Alpha Phi Alpha 



Majn 
2. .1; V 
3: Var; 


r. Biology 
•arsity Ba 
iity ■■S" ' 


ami Chemi 
sketliall 1, : 
CUil) 2. .'. 


stry: 
2, i\ 


Pan-Hellen 
Varsity Te 


ic Council 
niiis 1, J. 






Aliffe 


Ellis 










Augusta 


. G, 


a. 






Majo 
Malhetr 


r. :Mathe. 
lalics Ch: 


matics; V. 
lb 4; Amc 


w. 


Sc 


A. -t: Choir 4; 
iciolopical Societ> 



Harmon Fitch 

Winston-Salem. N. C. 



JuANiTA Gibson 

Pinevillc. Kentucky 



Major, English; Y. W. C. A. 3, 4; Little Theatre 
Cuiltl i. 4: Choir 3. 4; American Sociological Society 
3, 4; English Philological Society 3, 4. 



Paul Glover 
Oxford. N. C. 
Omega Psi Phi 



an Sociologica 
English Philu 



Major, History and English; Ameri 
Society. .1, 4; Little Theatre Guild 4; 
logical Society 3. 4. 



Vernon Grigg 

Charlotte, N. C. 



Major. History and English; America 
Society 3, 4; Glee Clul) 4; Football 1. 



Claudia Hargrave 

Cincinnati. Ohio 

Major. Sociology; Little Theatre Guild 4: Y, 
. A. 4; American Sociological Society 4; Choi. 



ZOEL S. Hargrave 

Charlotte. N. C. 

Omega Psi Phi 

•ench; Lc Ccrclc Francais 




Page Nmeteer, 



k. CI)C 1936 13ull 




Josef A. Harris 
St.itcsville. N. C. 
Alpha Phi Alpha 

Major, History; Varsity Basetiall I, 2; Varsity 
Fwitball 2; X'icePresident Sphinx Club 3: English 
Philological Society .!. A: American Sociological Society 



Hhnrv a. Hill 

Chicago. III. 
Kappa Alpha Psi 

. .Mathematics and Chemistry; Smith-Davidson 
-'. J. 4; President, Alpha Kai)|ia Sigma Hon- 

^i.riely .1. 4: Varsity Debating Team ,^, 4; 

.1. Pan-Hellenic Council 4; University Student 
Honorary .Member, American Sociological So- 
Scitncc Club i; Mathematics Club ,?, 4; Vice- 

ch. Alpha Epsilon Chapter of Kappa Alpha 



Rlcinald Hutchinson 

Washington. D. C. 

Kappa Alpha Pxt 

.Major. Ili.sf.ry and Economics: \arsitv Ha-kctl.all 
.!. 4; Smith-Daviilson Seminar .!, 4; President of 
Class 4; \arsity "S" Club .1, 4. 

Mrs. [one Jones 
Chester. S. C. 

.\Lil"r, KuKliOi; EnKli-.b Philological Society 3. 4; 
Little Theatre Cuild ,i. 4; American Sociological So- 
ciety 3. 4. 

ZiLLA F. LEDBETTER 
Charlotte. N. C. 

Major. Sociology. 

Ol.VMPlA P. LOWH 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Peyton Manning 
Knoxvillc. Tenn. 
Alpha Phi Alpha 

.Major. Physical Education and Sociology; Varsity 
Kontball .!, 4; Varsity Basketball 3. 4; V. M. C. A. 
.>. 4; Anurican .Sociolrigical Society J, 4; N'arsity 

•S" Club .1. 4. 



I 


■LOVD Masse V. Jr. 




Gastoni.1. N. C. 




Omcqa Psi Phi 


Maior. llislor 
Pan-Hellenic Coi 
Slu.lent .Manage 
Movement L 2. 
C. A. Cabinet 2, 
Sti,,l,-nl Start' .1; 
Davidson Semin: 


y an,l .Mathematics; N'lce-Presidcnt, 
nicil 3. 4; Debating Society 1. 3, 4; 
r of Debate 4; Student Volunteer 
3. 4; r.dversity Choir 1, 2. 3: V. M. 
, .!. 4; Varsitv Iv.otball 2; l'nm-r.ul\ 
Mathematics Club 1, 2. .!, 4; Smith- 
ir 3, 4; Little Theatre Guild .!, 4. 



Page Twenty 



^ Cf)C 1936 15un 



Samuel J. McLean 

Douglass, Ga 

Phi Beta Sigma 

Major. Mathematics: DebatiiiR Socictv 4. Littlt 

Theatre Ciiild .?. 4; Christian Leadership Cluli 1. -. 

.?. 4; American SocioloRical Society 3. 4 V. M C 

A. L 2, i. 4; Mathematics Club L 2, .i, 4 

Joseph H. Morris. Jr. 

Bcnnettsville. S. C 
Alpha Phi Alpha 
^[ajor. Cheiiiistry and Mathematics; I,ittle Theatre 
r.uihi .'. 4; Al|iha Kappa Sigma Honorary Suiiety 
,1, 4. 

Clarence E. Morrison 

Oxford. N. C. 

Omega Psi Phi 

Major. French and History: Le Cercle Francais 1, 

2, 3. 4; American Sociological Society 3. 4; Varsity 

Tennis .i. 4: Y. M. C. A, Cabinet 2. 3: Christian 

Leadership Club 1, 2. .i, 4. 

Clarence A. Parham 

Freehold, N. J. 

Kappa Alpha Psi 

Maior, History and Sociology: Presi.k-nt. American 

Sociological Society (Johnson C. Smith I'niversity 

Chapter) 3, 4: Little Theatre (luild ,1. 4: Alpha Kappa 

Sigma Honorary Society 4; Y. M. C. A. 3. 4. 

Isaiah Pogue 

Sumter. S. C. 
Omega Psi Phi 
Major, Mathematics "and C.eneral Science; Class 
President 1, 2, 3: President. Y. M. C. A. 3; Vice- 
President. Student Volunteer Movement 2, 3; Varsity 
Football 2. 3. 4: Le Cercle Francais 2; Mathematics 
Club 1. 2. 3, 4. 

Thomas Ringer 
Rocky Point, N. C. 

Major, History; Glee Club L 2, 3, 4; American 
Sociological Society 4; LIniversity Choir I, 2, 3, 4. 
Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3. 4. 

Walter F. Robinson 
Cheraw, S. C. 
Kappa Alpha Psi 
Major, Economics and French: Del 
3, 4; Little Theatre Guild 



3, 4. 



Willie M. Rudisill 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Major. Sociology 

Robert A. Smith 
Hickory, N. C. 



Alpha Phi Alpha 
Major, English and General Scien 
ciety 3: Le Cercle Francais 3. 4; 
logical Society 3, 4; Uniz'rr.viJv Studi 
lish Philological Society 
Class '■ '•---■•■• •■ = 



Debating So 

lis J, t; American Socio 

■sity Student Staff 3; Ens 

"usiness Manager u 



sity •■S" Club 4 

WILLIAM H. Smith 

Cape Charles, Va. 
Kappa Alpha Psi 
Major, General Science: Varsity Football 2; V; 
sity Baseball 2: American Sociological Society 3, 
Little Theatre Guild 4; University Student Staff 




Page Twenty-one 



^ Che 1930 13iill J 




Charles W. Tallev 

Chcraw. S. C. 

.Maj<tr, History; American Sociological Society .1. 
4; Christian Leadership Club 1. 2. 1. 4; Deliating So- 
ciety 2. .i. 4; Little Theatre Guild i, 4: Y. ^L C. A. 
1. 2. .!, 4; N'arsily Football 2, 3, 4: X'arsity Baseball 

1. 2. .!. 

Ethel Williams 
Little Rock, Ark. 

Sociological S. 



ociolog.cal So.iely 
, 4; V. \V. t. A. 



DOREATHA Williamson 

Charlotte. N. C. 
Major, Sociology. 

Thomas E. Wilson 
Bishopville. S. C. 

.\Iaji.r. llislory; Treasurer of Class 1. 2. .!. 4; 
Y. M. C. A. 2, ,i, 4; Christian Leadership Club 1. 2. 
.i. 4: University Chortis 1. 2. 3. 4; Y. M. C. A. Quar- 
tet 2. i, 4; American Sociological Society 3, 4. 

Joseph R. Wilson 

Wilmington. N. C. 

Kuppa Alpha P.si 

Majr.r. History : Football 1. 2; American Sociological 
.Society .!. 4; Little Theatre (iuilj .i ; Y. .\L C. A. 
1. 2. .!, 4; N'arsity Baseball 1. 

Marv a. Wright 
York. S. C. 

Mnjor, French; Y. W. C. A. .!. 4; Le Cercle Fran- 
ca.^ ,!, 4; Choir .!; Little Theatre (niil.l .1. 4; i'niyer- 
Mly Stuilenl SlalT .i . "Miss Johnson C. Smith" .i. 

Paul w. Wric.ht 

York, S. C. 

Omega Psi Phi 



Robert Wvche 

Charlotte. N. C. 



.Sociological .Society 3, 4; 



Catherine Yonc.ue 

Charlotte, N. C. 
.Major, Biology; Y. \V, C, A. 3. 4; Le Cercle Fr, 



Robert Young 
Wake Forest. N. C. 



W;unr, French and (ieneral Scienc 
ical .Society 3, 4; Le Cercle Fr 
. Mly Tennis 3, 4. 



an Socio. 
2, 3, 4; 



Page T went y- two 



L Cf)e 1936 TBull 



SENIOR CLASS HISTORY 

On the morning of September 19. 1932, F-amo and Fortune opened their portals to the 
faces of seventy-five courageous lads, whose eager, beaming eyes sought the Registrars Office 
and its registration service. These young men. each with a recently awarded high school diploma 
safely tucked under his arm, had come from far and near in response to the vibrant knock of 
Opportunity upon the veiled door of Education. All during the day they continued to come 
and to join arms with those natural anxieties, seasoned with current expectation and college 
fever, had sent them to the campus many hours in advance of the designated time for regis- 
tration. 

Thus entered the class of 1936. eager from its beginning, upon the pages of the history 
of Johnson C. Smith University. Behind this class lay twelve years of previous training, 
ahead of it lay four years of anticipation, in its immediate path by brilliant records of many 
a prosperous Alumnus, as well as the history of some who were just ordinary. All these things 
were signal impressions upon the plastic minds of nearly four score college freshmen. 

The first official gathering followed on the 2 1st of September, at which time Professor R. 
L. Douglass. "The Campus Philosopher." Mrs. H. L. McCrorey. and Dr. H. L. McCrorey, 
President of the Institution, welcomed the new students to the University and unveiled a huge 
block of educational marble, from which they were commissioned to carve a beautiful figure 
of mental, physical, and spiritual achievement. 

As each student stood and introduced himself, it is to be doubted whether he. or any of the 
older students and faculty members to whom he spoke fully realized that the institution into 
which he had enrolled was starting on a new era. With the Class of '3b. there came to the 
College the first regularly enrolled women students, whose Junior College work had been done 
at Barber Scotia Junior College. There were no co eds in the class, however, until its third 
season. 

Several weeks after its entrance, the class met to elect officers, and after many a piece of 
oratorical brilliance. Isaiah P. Pogue was selected to lead the class over its first milestone on 
experience, Charles 1.. Hamilton was chosen to write notes, and T. English Wilson was designated 
to keep the treasury of the class. With this leadership, the class moved forward at an alarming 
pace. All of the major organizations, with the exception of the Greek Letter Fraternities, held 
representatives of this class. At the end of the first semester, seven members had been placed 
on the scholastic honor roll, and at the end of the first year, at least one member had achieved 
a semester "A" average. 

Although heterogeneous from the beginning, the class functioned as a complete unit until 
late March of the first year. At this time came pledging to the various Greek Letter Fraternities, 
and the result was evident in four distinct factions, growing more distant every moment. Before 
a state of complete distraction was reached, the first milestone was reached, and the summer vaca- 
tion brought relief to the situation. 

In the fall of 1933. most of the original class returned. With them came a slightly larger 
assortment of women students, who like the first, entered the Junior Class. After three months 
of absence, factional differences were forgotten and again a seance was assembled to call leaders 

Page Tu.'entii-three 



^ Ci)e 1936 15un A 



to the front. This time. Isaiah P. Pogue was reelected to presidency, while the task of note- 
taking was given to Moses A. Blair. T. English Wilson was given charge of monies for the 
second time. During the first semester of 19 '5^34, pledges were initiated into the various 
Fraternities and the element of difference was minimized. The football team, ihc basketball 
team, the Y. M. C. A., the Christian Leadership Preparatory Club. Mathematics, French, and 
Science Clubs all found valuable members from the sophomore class. At the end of the semester 
five persons were still on the Deans Honor Roll. During the second semester the class moved 
ahead more smoothly than the second semester of the first year. When the second milestone 
was reached and vacations began, another member had achieved the semester "A" rank. 

In September, lOH. about fifty members registered as Juniors. With them came the first 
women to the class, and in the first meeting of the class, officers were elected — one of whom was 
a co-ed. The head of the class went to Isaiah P. Pogue for the third time, while Mary Coles 
Shaw was chosen to scribble accounts of the meetings. Also for the third time. T. English 
Wilson was elected treasurer. The same activities of the sophomore year were continued, with 
the addition of several class members on the staff of the Univi-rsity Student. At the end of the 
first semester, the first and second and third highest ranking scholastic records belonged to 
members of the class. Toward the middle of the second semester, factional differences arose 
again, and this time threatened to do big things for a while. But time, the healer of all 
wounds, stepped in and the sore spots were eased. At the Junior Prize Oration Contest. OIlie 
A. Johnson, a co-ed of the class, made history in the Institution by being the first woman 
student ever to be awarded the Oratorical Contest Prize in the history of the University. 

In the fall of 1935. sixty members registered for the last milestone in the journey to a 
Bachelors degree. Reginald T. Hutchinson replaced Isaiah Pogue as president, and Moses A. 
Blair was chosen to write minutes. For the fourth consecutive year. T. E. Wilson was given 
charge of the finances. Just before the close of the firs! semester, factional differences, afrcr long 
smoldering, burst into flame again. This time, the whole machinery of the school was threatened, 
and all along the journey to the last milestone, the harmony of the group was never completely 
restored. At the end of the semester, the class had representatives in every organization on the 
campus for students, the two highest records of scholastic achievement were records of Seniors, 
who were also vieing for Summa Cum I.aude distinction at graduation. During this year the 
women's basketball team came into being, and several women ot the class were members of the 
team. Finally in a last burst for perfection, the class functioned as a good unit and crossed the 
last milestone, with the belief thai To the Victor Belongs the Spoils," 

Four years passed. Friends were made and lost, Diflicullies were braved and conquered. 
Foads were lifted and work was done. Whether this class is to be remembered or not is a matter 
that only time can solve. Whether this class has completeti its mission to carve a statute of 
intellectual perlection or not is letl lor the world to see and determine — but one thing is sure: 

Like the mit/hni icjrriurs of Gog and Samothrace 

Tbvy may not hace curved Perfection's breast. 
But LChen uilh problems and tasks face to face. 

It IS an established truth — they did their best . . . 

— MOSLS BI..MR Secretary of Class. 



Page Tiventy-fui. 




JUNIOR GLASS 
O F F I G i: R S 

Joseph Belton President 

Edwin Greenlee Vice-President 

Claude Sloan Business Manager 

Francena Clarkson Secretary 



JUNIORS 



€lK 103C 13iill A 




Eugene A. Adair 
James W. Barnette 
Whitmeld Battle 

NORENE M. BaYLESS 

Joseph C. Belton 
UsHRY W. Best 

Mary E. Benton 
Weldon H. Brown 
Francena G. Clarkson 

l. g. cottingham 
Otis C. Dave;nport 
Sylvia C. Davis 



Haywood W. Debnam 
Henry C. Dugas. Jr. 



Paijn 7 u.t'n(i/-six 



Cfje 1936 IBuU a 



Dorothy M. Dusenbury 
Charles H. Fleming 
William H. Gaines 

James A. Gaulden 
James P. George 
Edwin C. Greenlee 



AsBURL L. Holland 
Rendall a. Howell 
LaNell Jackson 



Edward J. Johnson 
Ethel D. Johnson 
Minnie W. Johnson 



Cordelle H. Kennedy 
John N. Ladson 




ge Twenty-seven 



€:bt 1936 ISulI 




James W. Lynch 
Alta M. Mcknight 
Addii- N. Moore 



John H. Moore 
Joseph W. Parker 
Cassius M. Plair 

Geneva G. Plair 
Ollie B. Pratt 
Edward L. Price 

Herbert O. Reid 
Lucinda R. Russell 
Margery C. Simmons 



Howard H. Sims 



Page Tu.'1-nty-eiilht 



L Cfje 1936 TBuIl A 



James H. Smith 
Claude E. Sloan 
Mary H. Stinson 

Cecelia M. Toatley 
Clarence Turner 
Odie G. Walker 



Eugene W. Wall 
David D. Webber 
Irene A. Webster 



Hattie H. Westbrook 
Castle C. Williams 
Ethelyn M. Wilson 



John A. Woods 




Page Ticenty-nine 



"TO A PICTURE" 

Sighing away the minutes, trying to forget. 
Sad heart pining witli one mad regret, 
^'ou're looking at me with that teasing smile. 
Would I be happy to talk with you awhile. 



'I'ou change not your countenance with all thai I say. 
Just the same as ever, you must have your way. 
Silent, you are. you change not your glance, 
'^'ou don't ever offer me a second chance. 

— Ja.mes Lynch. Class of '37 . 




SOPHOMORE GLASS 
OFFICERS 

Robert L. Hardin President 

Cornell A. Johnson Vice-President 

James T. SMrrw Business Manager 

Edwin K. Hancock Secretary 



SOPHOMORES 



k. ^t)t 1936 T3U1I A 




SOPHOMORES 

Garland R. Baxter John T. Collins 

Milton M. Belle William J. Costner 

Francis K. Bostic Frank C. Crei-t 

James A. Brown James B. Ellis 

DeGranville Burke Marion L. Fleming 



Page Thirty-two 



^ Clje 1936 'JBuIl 




SOPHOMORES 



John L. Green 
Edwin K. Hancock 
Robert L. Hardin 
Walter S. Hardy 
Robert W. Harris 



Clifton H. Hawthorne 
William C. Hines 
Cornell A. Johnson 
Samuel J. Lilly 
Elijah J. Marbury 



Page Thirty-three 



cix 




S O P H O M O R 1 : s 



Robert Massey 
Marcellus Miller 
Isaac L. Pruitt 
Antonio M. Simpson 
James T. Smith 



Bampeield Stinson 
Lovette a. Warner 
Albert L. White 
liDWARD S. Williams 
Mack Williams 



Thomas H. Wvche 



Pa<}e Thirly-fnur 




FRESHMAN 


GLASS 


OFFICERS 


Bddie Evans 


President 


Willie Watt 


Vice-President 


Richard Richardson 


Treasurer 


=RANK CORBETT 


Secretary 



FRESHMEN 



^ €\)C 1936 13ull ^ 




FRESHMEN 



EUGENR G. ARRINGTON 

HuBFRT U. Barbour 
Edward O. Broadnax 
Paul L. Butlhr 
John F. Carr 
Arthur G. Coopir 
F-'rank J. Corbett 
Angus P. Cori.i;y 
George R. Douglass 



AsBURY E. Ellis 
Hunter F, Ellis 
Eddie W. Evans 
Thi (^n- O. Garrett 
Otha C. Harris 
Elo L. He:nderson 
John H. Hoeeman 
ErniuST C. Jackson 
Charles G. Kearns 



Herman C. McQueen 



PaQC Thir[u-^t.\ 



^ Cf)C 1936 IBuU A 




FRESHMEN 



William B. Markliam 
Milton B. Meadows 
Jambs H. Nllson 
Olin W. Pearson 
James W. Perry 
Gareield a. Pratt 
John H. Rennick 
Richard C. Richardson 
Charles W. Robinson 



Johnnie H. Saunders 
William G. Sanders 
David Smith 
Willie R. Turner 
Cleveland N. Tate 
Willie; E. Watt 
George Wilkins 
Elias T. Wilson 
Franklin D. Wood 



George W. Young 



Page Thirty-seven 



^ €l)€ 1936 'Bull A 




SPECIAL STUDENTS 



CoRRiE E. Hart 
Mary Hollidav 



Lilian L. Rudisilh 
Sarah L. Wychh 



I'aQr' ThirlLi eight 



^ Cf)e 1936 13uU A 




THEOLOGICAL FACULTY 

Charles H. Shute. A.B., S.T.B.. D.D. 
Dean and Professor of Syslemalic and Pastoral J heology 

PiNCKNEY W. Russell, A.B.. S.T.B., D.D. 
Professor of Biblical Literature 

Algernon Odell Steele. A.B., A.M., B.D. 
Professor of Religious Education and English Bible 

Arthur H. George, A.B.. S.T.M. 
Professor of Homiletics and Church History 



Pagf Thirty-nine 



.. 13ull 



THEOLOGS 




SENIORS 

Moses Belton. S.B. 
Columbia. South Carolina 

CORRIE W. BOYCE. A.B. 
Byphalia, Mississippi- 



Herman L. Counts. A.B. 
Roland. North Carolina 

Leonard A. Lllis. A.B. 
Due West. South Carolina 



James F-. Henderson. A.B. 
Columbia. South Carolina 

Elmer H. Hunt. S.B. 
Charlotte. North Carolina- 



Robert L. Jeans. A.B. 
Shannon, iMississippi 

WiLijA.M V. Joyne:r. A.B. 
Rockv Mount. North ("arolina 



Albert A. Thompson. A.B. 
Decatur. Cieorgia 



Page Forty 



L Cfje 1936 IBuU A 



T 1 1 E O L O G S 



UNDERGRADUATES 

William F. Cannon. S.B. 
Laurens, Soutli Carolina 

Obra J. Hawkins, A.B. 
Waskom, Texas 



William T. Nelson, A.B. 
Mayesville, South Carolina 

David S, Pogue, A.B. 
Sumter, South Carolina 



Backmon R. Richardson, S.B. 
Irmo, South Carolina 

Lazarus B. Washington. A.B. 
Charleston, South Carolina 



Robert C. Johnson. A.B. 
Columbia, South Carolina 




Vags Forty-one 



^ i 




lllliOLOCICAL LlP.RAIC, 




ORGANIZATIONS 



ClK 1936 '15u\\ Jk 




BULL STAFF 

Clarence D. Turner Editor-in-Chief 

Herbert O. Reid Bufuncss Manager 

PROi-iissoR Bertram L. Woodruef Faculu/ Adviser 

Professor William C. Donnell I-aculty Adviser 



Page FnrlU'fouT 



^ HLbc 1936 '15UII 




BULL STAFF 

Claude Sloan Assistant Editor 

Cassius Plair Assistant Business Manager 

Otis Davenport Advertising Manager 

John Moore Advertising Manager 

David Webber Advertising Manager 

WelDON Brown Photographic Editor 

Ethel Johnson Literary Editor 

Odie Walker Athletic Editor 

Geneva Plair Feature Editor 

Eugene Adair Publicity Manager 

pRANCENA Clarkson Secretary 

Henry Dugas. Jr Art Editor 

Joseph Parker Art Editor 

Antonio Simpson Art Editor 



Page Fortufic 



L €i)c 193(3 1?iill ^ 



% 



K' 






UNIVERSITY STUDENT STAFF 

OFFICERS 

James W. Lynch Editor-in-Chief 

OLYMPIA Lowe Associate Editor 

James Gaulden News Editor 

Moses Blair Secretary of Staff 

Claude Sloan Business Manager 

Robert Hardin Circulation Manager 



REPORTERS 



AsBURi, Holland 
Henry Hill 
Eugene Wall 
James Smith 
Ethhl Johnson 
Howard Sims 
Joseph Parker 



JuANiTA Gibson 
Herbert Reid 
WiLEORD Hammond 
George Young 
Odie Walker 
Ernest Madison 
William Smith 



FACUL TV ADVISERS 
Proeessor Bertram L. Woodritl Pkoi issor William C. Donnell 



Page Forty six 



Cf)C 1936 151111 ^ 




RHO OMIGRON SIGMA 
DEBATING SOGIETY 

In 1931. while the Johnson C. Smith Debating Club was working under the leadership 
of Professor Bertram Woodruff, it was unanimously decided that the name of the club be 
changed to Rho Omicron Sigma. The purpose of this society is to sponsor and to encourage 
college debating. The members have worked unceasingly toward this end. 

OFFICERS 

Floyd MASSEV student Manager 

CLARENCE TURNER Assistant Student Manager 

James GAULDEN Secretary 

Henry Hill PabUcnq Manager 

Fred W. Bond Facultg Adviser 

MEMBERS 

Charles Talley James Lynch 

Samuel McLean Robert Hardin 

Frederick Robinson Elias Wilson 

Herbert Reid George Young 



Page Forty-seven 



^ Chf 1936 13IIII 




ENGLISH PHILOLOGICAL 
SOCIETY 



Professor Bertram 1,. Woodruff, seeing the need of .in English Club to promote interest 
in good literature and practical application of English, founded the English Philological Society 
in 1931. That year the club was composed of men only and it was not until the following 
year with the entrance of young women to the campus that the club welcomed them into its 
folds. 

The society has expanded from its original position of including only English majors 
to include all Juniors and Seniors who minor in English. 



OLLiE Johnson 

Ruth Hills.man 
Ja.vies Lynch 

Dorothy Dusenbury 
Paul Glover . . . 



OFFICERS 



Presidcnl 

First Vice-President 

Second Vice-President 
Secretary 

Treasurer 



Bernich Blakeney 
Frank Crept 
Sylvia Davis 
Roberta Douc.lass 
Dorothy Dusenbury 
Roberta Ellis 
Paul Glover 
Vernon Grigg 



Edwin Hancock 



MEMBERS 

Avant Harris 
Ruth Hillsman 
Ethel Johnson 
Minnie John.son 
Ollie Johnson 
lONE Jones 
John Ladson 



Associate Members 

Ernest Mattison 



James Lynch 
Elijah Marbury 
Geneva Plair 
Robert S.mith 
Esther Stinson 
Castle Williams 
Odie Walker 
Ethelyn Wilson 



Howard Sims 



Proeessor E. L, Rann 



tully Advisers 

Proeessor Bi:rika.\i Woodruie 



Page Forty-eight 



1^ C!)e 1936 IBuU 




Thomas A. Long. A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of Sociology and Cfiairman of ihe Division of Social Sciences 



Dr. Long is a member of the American Sociological Society; the American 
Geographical Society, New York; the Academy of Political Science, Columbia 
University: the American Academy of Political and Social Science, University 
of Pennsylvania: the Southern Sociological Society; the American Guild of 
Organists and the North Carolina Chapter. He was a member of the Ninth 
Session of the International Psychological Congress, Yale University. 1929. 

The Johnson C. Smith University Chapter of the American Sociological 
Society was granted a charter through the membership of Dr. Long in the parent 
society. 



Page Forty-nine 



€t)C 1936 151111 jM 









l\n- Johnson C. Smith Univhrsity Chapthr oi- 

THE AMERICAN SOCIOLOGICAL 
SOCIETY 

The Johnson C. Smith University chapter of ihc American Sociological Society was 
granted a charter at Chicago. Illinois. February 3, 1Q34, and is recognized as chapter number 
three of the American Sociological Society. Dr. Thomas A. Long. Professor of Sociology and 
a member of the parent society, is adviser. 

OFFICERS 
Clarence A. P,\rham President 

Herbert O. REID Vice-Prestdem 

Castle C. Williams Secretary 

Ethel D. Johnson Treasurer 

JUANITA C. Gibson Reporter 



.MEMBERS 



Clarence A. Parham 
John Coles 
Paul Glover 
William Markham 
Sylvia Davis 
Isaac Pruitt 
Charles Dusenblrv 
Rainey Wilson 
William S.mith 
Castle Williams 
Otis Davenport 
Ethel Johnson 
WiLPORD Hammond 
Edward Si.ms 
Herberi Reid 
Robert Massev 
Mrs. Ione Jones 



Edward Cannady 
Paul Wric.ht 
Peyton Manning 
Samuel McLean 
Bernice Blakeney 
James Christian 
Claude Sloan 
Garland Baxter 
Willia.m Costner 
Hunter Ellis 
Ethelyn Wilson 
Sa.muel Lilly 
Ei.ias Wilson 
Claude Walker 
Milton Cox 
Milton Meadows 
Carrie Ramseur 



Ba.meield Stinson 
Charles Talley 
James Lynch 
Sterleta Perrin 
Eugene Wall 
Aliefe Ellis 
Edward Price 
James George 
Booker Davis 
Asburl Holland 
Edward Johnson 
AvANT Harris 
ZlLI.IA Ledbetter 
juanita gib.son 
Odie Walker 
Claudia Hargrave 
Mrs. Minnie Johnson 



Elijah Marbury 
Mack Williams 
CoRRiE Hart 
Willie Turner 
Ollie Pratt 
I'ho.mas Grier 
Ai.ERED Coleman 
Harmon Fitch 
David Webber 
Otis Hawkins 
Antonio Simpson 
UsiiERY Best 
Edward Williams 
Eddie Evans 
Jerome Marshall 
Vernon Grigg 



Page Fifty 



L Cf)C 1936 TBuII A 




LITTLE THEATRE GUILD 



During the academic year, the Little Theatre Guilci of Jolinson C. Smith University is a 
delectable, diligent, and colorful organization. The Little Theatre Guild is busy on the pro- 
duction of Shakespearean and modern drama. The work shop, always open for observation, 
is situated in an upper chamber of the Administration building where the students design, 
study, discuss, and rehearse. Here it is, that students gather around tables and in groups to 
prepare for the innumerable opportunities which the club has to offer. They not only par- 
ticipate in the practical application of stage craft, but exchange opinions and experiences with 
the director and nationally known critics and writers on the stage. 



OFFICERS 



JAMES Watkins Lynch 
JuANiTA Gibson 

Claude Eugene Sloan 

Ollie Johnson 

Otis Cullen Davenport 



President 

Secretary 

Business Manager 

Production Manager 
Stage Manager 



James Lynci 



COMMITTEE ON PLAY SELECTION 
Mary Coles Shaw Ollie Johnson 
Otis C. Davenport Claude E. Sloan 
Professor Fred w. Bond. Director 



Joseph Belton 



Bernice Blakeney 
^GtAUDE E, Sloan 
Lucinda Russell 
Mary Coles Shaw 
Winslow Talley 
William H. Smith 
Eugene Adair 
JuANiTA Gibson 



MEMBERS 

Ethelyn Wilson James Lynch 
Charles Dusenbury Otis Davenport 



Joseph Belton 
Floyd Massey 
Milton Cox 
Frederic Robinson 
Paul Glover 
Irene Webster 
Geneva Plair 



Sylvia Davis 

NORENE BAYLESS 

Francena Clarkson 
La Nelle Jackson 
Mary Benton 
Clarence Parham 
John Coles 



loNE Jones 
Alice Wright 
Rainey Wilson 
Claudia Hargrave 
James Smith 
Roberta Douglass 
Harmon Fitch 
Castle Williams 



Page Fifty-one 




/ 



PAN-HELLENIC COUNCIL 

For the purpose of creating better relations among the several fraternities on the campus. 

/of affording equal opportunities, and of administering justice according to its constitution for 
the mutual good of the groups, the Pan-Hellenic Council was organized in 1929. It has since 
lis uiti^ll'llLy endeavored to carry out this purpose and has been a cianstructive force in regulat- 
1 ing fraternal activities for the best interest of all concerned. In all its efforts it has attempted 

\ to concert the best measures for the promotion of the fraternities and the development of the 

college life in general. 

OFFICERS 

Hhnkv a. Hill President 

1-LOVD MASSEY Vice- President 

Hubert a. Eaton Secreiaru 

MEMBERS 

Hubert Eaton .\ •!' .\ 

Claude Sloan a '!■ a 

Henry Hill K A ^' 

Herbert Reid K \ji^ 

Edwin Greenlee «.> * <P^ 

Floyd Massev !> * 4>, 

Samuel McLean •!■ b i: 

Ja.vies Christian 'i' B i 







FACULTY ADVISER 



Proeessgr George T. Kyle 



Page Fifty-two 



L Cfte 1936 IBUII 




Alpha Omicron Chapter of ^^a 

ALPHA PHI ALPHA , . !« 

The Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, the oldest of the four ^l I jS^ '"''' ' 
Negro Greek letter fraternities, was established at Cornell ■• \\ ^ 

University. Ithaca. New York during the school year *^i </ J^ C' 
1905-1906. by a small group of Negro students in vari- \>ii-s-^ '/ 

ous fields of endeavor. '-'^^^^^ 

The Alpha Omicron Chapter was set up on the campus of Johnson C. 
Smith University, May 4, 1923, and has exerted all efforts in the advancement 
of campus activities of the students and the University. ■■ 

The active membership; 

Hubert A. Eaton President 

James J. Abney Vice-President 

Henry C. Dugas. Jr financial Secretary and Treasurer 

Joseph H. Morris Recording Secretary 

Claude E. Sloan Corresponding Secretary 

J. AvANT Harris Chaplain 

Robert Smith Peyton Manning 

Winthrop Boulware Ernest Mattison 



/ 



Page Fitlythrei 



L Ct)C 1936 IBull 





Alpha Epsilon Chapter or 

PHI BETA SIGMA 

The National Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity was founded 
in the year of 1914 on the campus of Howard Univer- 
sity in Washington, D. C. The object of this fraternity 
is the promotion of brotherhood, scholarship, and service. 

In 1927 the Alpha Epsilon Chapter was established on the campus of 
Johnson C. Smith University. The basic fundamentals of its constitution 
is "Culture For Service And Service For Humanity." The ideals of our 
predecessors have been preserved by the excellent leadership of our Presideni 
and cooperation of its members. For nine years the chapter has been empha- 
sizing "Bigger and Better Negro Business Week. ' 



OFFICERS 



Samuhi. J. McLean . . . 
John K. Haili-y 
Jamhs a. Chrkstian 
Edward J. John.son 

Am RID I'ho.mpson 



MEMBERS 



President 

X' ice- President 
Secrelan./ and Treasurer 
Crescent Manaaer 

I . AZ AR L',S W A.Sl 1 1 NGTON 



Payc t {fly-four 



^ Cf)C 1936 T5UII M 





Alpha Epsilon Chapter of 



KAPPA ALPHA PSI 



Kappa Alpha Psi was founded at the University of 
Indiana at Bloomington. It was incorporated under v< 

the laws of that state in 1911. The Alpha Epsilon 
Chapter was established at Johnson C. Smith University. December 10, 1927. -->^,^ / 
We always strive to uphold the ideals of our fraternity. The unquenched ^?s^ 

desire for the attainment of this goal is always present. We are good Kappas — 
the world knows the rest. 

ROSTER 

Herbert Ordre Reid Polemarch 

Milton Edward Cox Vice-Polewarch 

Henry Aron Hill Keeper of Records 

David Demosthenes Webber Assistant Keeper of Records 

William Henry Smith Keeper of Exchequer 

Elijah Jefferson Marbury Strategus 

Clarence Andrew Parham Lieutenant 

James Watkins Lynch Historian. Reporter 

Reginald Theodore Hutchinson Polemarch -Emeritus 

Walter Frederic Robinson Polemarch-Ementu: 

Joseph Rainly Wilson 



Page Fifty-five 



i,€hc I 





SCROLLER'S CLUB 



The name Scroller's Club was first introduced by Elias Tuggle in l'5l9. at 
Ohio State University. Its purpose was to give the men of Kappa Alpha Psi 
Fraternity a chance to study the calibre of their prospective brothers. The 
Scroller's Club of Alpha Epsilon chapter at Johnson C. Smith University was 
founded in 1 927. 

The present membership of the Scroller's Club of Alpha Hpsilon Chapter 
at Johnson C. Smith University. Charlotte. North Carolina, consists ol ihe 
following named persons: 

Howard Sims Presidcni 

f-DWARD PrICF; Vicc-Presidcnl 

Isaac Pruitt Secretary 

LnONIDAS COTTINGHAM RvpurUr 

MEMBERS 

IKANK COKBIHT Ol I lA HARRIS .Il)llN Rl-NNICK 

•JAMKS GAULDliN JOHN COLl-: CHARI.HS ROBINSON 

Claudk WAi.KiiR James Brown John Woods 

Edward Broadnax Ernest Jackson Arthur Cooper 

jAMHs Perry 



l^age Fiflysix 



Ci)e 1936 TBuU A 





Rho Chaptfr of 

OMEGA PS I PHI %^ ^t ^. 

On November 17. 1 'M 1 nt Howard University. Washing 6'^^KJaS^^s^^-'}^ 

ton. D. C. the Omega Psi Phi I'raternity wa.s founded by -^^curmsimmi^ 

Brothers Edgar A. Love. Oscar J. Cooper, and Frank Coleman, 
in company with Professor E. E. Just. 

Rho Chapter of the Omega Psi Phi F-raternity was the first 
chapter of a national fraternity to be located on Smith's cam 
pus. It was established at Smith on November 7. 1<321, and ,.J^ 

Rho has. from that time on. steadily progressed under the 
guidance of her loyal sons. At the present. Rho is striving to 
inculcate into her sons those ideas of manhood, scholarship, 
perseverance, and uplift, which tend to create a more whole- 
some spirit among all. 

OFFICERS 

Isaiah Pogue Basileus 

John Moore Vice-BasHeus 

Moses Blair Keeper of Records and Seals 

Joseph Belton Keeper of Finance 

Robert Denson Chaplain 

Clarence Turner Chapter Editor 

Paul Glover Keeper of f^euce 

MFMBERS 

James Boyd William Mines Clarence Morrison 

Charles Dusenbury Rendall Howell Floyd Massey 

Edwin Hancock Charles Greenlee Paul Wright 

Robert Hardin Zoel Hargrave Weldon Brown 

Cornell Johnson 



Page Ftfly-seven 



L Cfjc 1936 15uII 



miBam^ 




.^.^^^^j; LAMPADOS CLUB 

1 he Lampados Club, the pledge club of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, was 
founded for the purpose of preparing men for the true fraternal lifeT The 
rnembers of the club have pledged themselves to the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity 
and they are striving to uphold those noble principles for which the Lampados 
Club stands. 

OFFICERS 

JamI;S T. S.MITIl Presidenr 

Mack Williams Vice- President 

Robert A. Harris Secretary 

MarchlLUS Miller Assistant Secretary 

William J. Costnhr Seryeunt-At-Arms 

Walter S. Hardy I reasurer 

Joseph W. Parki:r Reporter 

John V. Collins Chaplain 

members 
Edward S. VVillia.ms Willia.m H. Gaini s Eli,i:ni-: G. AkriN(,ton 

Clihton H. Hawthorni- Elo L. Henderson Hi:rman M. Moore 

Charles G. Kearns Lorette A. Warner William G. Sanders 

Odell T, Gakri-ii 

Page I-ifty-eighl 



k. Cf)C 1936 ISuU 




CHRISTIAN LEADERSHIP 
PREPARATORY CLUB 

In the fall of 19 29 a group of Freshmen, candidates for the ministry, resolved to organize 
a club for mutual benefit in facing the campus life and preparing for the greater problems of life 
after college. On October 17. 1929 the group met in a room in Carter Hall and organized 
the Christian Leadership Preparatory Club with Moses Belton as president and Herman L. 
Counts, secretary. The club was composed of thirteen members. During the scholastic year 
1932-1933 the club was composed of every candidate for the ministry in the college and has 
thus continued ever since. The following Seniors in the School of Theology are charter mem- 
bers: Moses Belton. C. W. Boyce. H. L. Counts. L. A. Ellis, and R. L. Jeans. Other Theologs 
who were members of the club are: E. L. McAdams. charter member; T. H. Bullock. R. C. 
.Johnson. W. T. Nelson. K. D. Poguc. and L. B. Washington. 

OFFICERS 
Edward S. Williams President 



Robert Massey 
John Woods 
George W. Young 
Elo L. Henderson 
Milton M. Bell 
Booker T. Davis 
DeGranville Burke 
Ernest C. Jackson 



Clarence Morrison 
Booker Davis 
Thomas Wilson 
Charles Tallev 
Edward Johnson 
Eddie Evans 
Samuel McLean 
Garfield Pratt 
Milton Cox 
CoRDELL Kennedy 



Vice-President 

. Secretary 

Assistant Secretary 

Treasurer 

. Chairman of Program Committee 

Chairman of Social Committee 

Chairman of Publicity Committee 

Orderly 



MEMBERS 
Edward Williams 
James Barnette 
Robert Massey 
Ernest Mattison 
DeGranville Burke 
William Burke 
Antonio Si.mpson 
Milton Bell 
James George 
Elijah Marbury 
Theodore Goodjoin 



Olin Pearson 
JOHN Woods 
Franklin Wood 
Elo Henderson 
Ernest Jackson 
George Younc; 
John Rennick 
John Carr 
Ollie Pratt 
James Christian 



Page Fifty-nine 



k. Cbc 1936 15un A 




Y. W. C. A. 

The Young Women's Christian Association is an organization on the 
campus to which every girl has the right and privilege to belong. This organi- 
zation was first organizeci on February 11. 193t with the suggestion and en- 
couragement of Mrs. H. L. McCrorey. Soon after organizing the ^society 
became affiliated with the National Young Women's Christian Association. 

Its foremost purpose is for the all-around development of the lives of the 
girls on the campus. 

OFFICERS 

Sylvia Davis , . President 

Bf.RNICE BlakneY Vice-President 

Francena Clarkson Secretary 

Claudia Hargrave Treasurer 

Mrs. H. L. McCrorey Adviser 

MEMBERS 

Juanita GihsoN Mary A. Wright Lucinda Russell 

Mary Shaw Ethel Lee Williams Ethelyn Wilson 

Ruth Hillsman Bernice Blakeney Aliffe Ellis 

Geneva Plair Dorothy Dusenbury Claudia Hargravi 

Hattie Westbrook Francena Clarkson Sylvia Davis 

Castle, Wili.ia.\ls Oi.lie Johnson 



Page Sixty 



Cfje 1936 IBuIl 




Y.M.G.A. CABINET 

The Johnson C. Smith University Chapter of the Y. M. C. A. has always 
had for its fundamental purpose the hope of building strong physical, mental, 
and spiritual characters, and to perpetuate the ideals of Christianity within 
the student body. 

During 1935-1936, the chapter has taken on a very definite secondary pur- 
pose, which has been to germinate, incubate, give birth to and to nurture to 
maturity a well-rounded school spirit — something which has been hardly 
realized during the last college generation. 

Those persons who were officers and members of the 19 35-1936 Y. M. 
C. A. Cabinet, whose efforts are unparalleled in diligence, and whose struggles 
are about to merit positive results, are; 

OFFICERS 

Joseph C. Belton 

Moses A, Blair 

Antonio M. Simpson 

Samuel J, McLean 

James A. Gaulden 

Professor Nor.vial C. Crosby 

MEMBERS 



President 

Secretary 

. . Assistant Secretary 

Treasurer 
Publicity Manager 

Faculty Adviser 



Frederic Robinson 
Olympia p. Lowe 
Isaiah Pogue, Jr, 
George Young 



Eugene Adair 
James Christian 
Samuel Williams 



Elo Henderson 
Robert Massey 
Floyd Massey 
Robert Hawthorne 



Page Sixty -one 



L Cf)C 1936 15uU 




U N I V i: R S I 1 \ O U I N T K T 



Dr. T. A. l,ong. realizing the beauty of harmony among five \^'ell -trained 
voices, organized in the year I "^08 the University Quintet, which has since that 
time become a definite part of the institution. 

The Quintet made its first appearance at the General Assembly of the Pres- 
byterian Church in IQOO and has appeared at every Assembly since then. 



I enors 
J A.Mrs BOVD 

Frank Corbftt 
Rk;hard Richardson 



Baritone 
Rezndell HoWliLL 



Bass 

THO.MAS RlNCil-R 



David E. Carroll. Director 



Page Sixty two 



^ Ct)C 1936 TSull ^ 




THE WOMEN'S SEXTETTE 

The Women's Sextette was organiz.ed the first semester of the school year, 
1935-36. under the direction of Mr. David E. Carroll, the music in- 
structor of the University. This organization, being the first women's sextette 
to be organized on the campus, was entered into with much enthusiasm, and 
interest on the part of the young women. They made their first appearance 
at the Vesper service on December 11. 1935. 

The purpose of this organization is to interpret song literature according 
to the highest standards. 



f irsf Sopranos 

NORENE BAYLESS 

Geneva Plair 



Second Sopranos 
Mary Benton 
Ruth Hillsman 



Altc 



Claudia Hargrave 
Ethelyn Wilson 



Page Sixty-rhrcc 



L Or lt)36 ISull 




THE UNIVERSIIY CHOIR 



l^hc aim of the University Choir is to interpret artistically the test of 
;horal music. 



Sopranos 

NORENE BAYLESS 

Mary Benton 
Aliefe Ellis 
Roberta Ellis 
J u ANITA Gibson 
Ruth Hillsman 
Ollie Johnson 
Geneva Plair 



Tenors 
James Barnett 
James Boyd 
Frank Corbett 
Edwin Hancock 
Walter Hardy 
Rendell Howell 
Harvey Michael 
John Saunders 
Richard Richardson 



Alu 



Bi-rnice Blaki;ni;y 
La Nelle Jackson 
Claudia Hargrave 
LuciNDA Russell 
Ethelyn Wilson 



Basses 

De Grandval Burke 
Arthur Cooper 
Samuel Lilly 
Thomas Ringi;r 
Thomas Wilson 



David E. Carroll. Dirccu 



Page Sixty-four 



Ci)e 1936 15uU A 




MEN'S GLEE CLUB 



MEMBERS 



John Brooks 
Robert Brown 
Arlin Bryant 
John Carr 
John Cohen 
John Collins 
Arthur Cooper 
Frank Corbett 
Angus Corley 
Hunter Ellis 
Eddie Evans 
William Freeman 
Theodore Goodjohn 
Vernon Grigg 
Frank Hammond 
Otha Harris 
Ernest Jackson 
Cordell Kennedy 

Edward 



James Keno 
John Ladson 
Peyton Manning 
Robert Massey 
Ernest Mattison 
Milton Meadows 
Harvey Michael 
Clarence Parham 
Olin Pearson 
Ollie Pratt 
Richard Richardson 
John Saunders 
William Sanders 
Claude Sloan 
David Smith 
Cleveland Tate 
Willie Turner 
George Wilkins 
Williams 



David E. Carroll. Director 



Page Sixty-five 




Rl-ADIM , lie. ;\1 1 Hi I 



\i<.\ — School op Thi-;ologv 




ATHLETICS 



^ mc 1936 li3ull ^ 



FOOTBALL 





Herbert Penn 

Coach 



David Ray 
Assiituni Couch 




Dean McKinnev 
Chairman Athletic Board 



Page Sixly-eighl 



^ me 1936 T5ull J 




FOOTBALL REVIEW 



RESULTS OF THE SEASON 



Smith , . . . 


. . . ^ 


Smith 


. . . . 


Smith 


3 


Smith 


19 


Smith 





Smith 





Smith 


14 



A. « T. College 19 

Knoxville College 

Shaw University ,14 

St. Augustine College - 

Blueficld College 27 

N. C. State College 6 

Livingston College 



During the football season of 1935. two motives were carried out by the 
gold and blue Bulls: discipline and clean sportsmanship. With these two 
motives functioning 100 9' the Bulls accomplished more than if they had won 
the championship. Although there is nothing to be regretted on the lower 
end of the scoring ranks winning is not the only viewpoint in athletics. Hav- 
ing won two games, lost four, and tied one, the Bulls closed a hard-fought 
season with hopes of redeeming themselves in the years following. 



Page Sixty-nine 



L Cbe 1936 IBuW 



FOOTBALL 




Those having played their last season of this well-loved sport will long be 
remembered by their team-mates, coaches, and spectators. C. P. Dusenbury. 
Captain, was very outstanding with his spectacular running and excellent driv- 
ing of his team as quarterback. Charles Talley and Claude Walker, tricky 
ends, proved themselves very efficient and were liked by all. J. T. Boyd, half- 
back, was very outstanding during his years of play and his spectacular run- 
ning and hard hitting won him a place among those of highest rank. With 
Abney and Manning in tackle only a strong wind could pass through them 
for they were known as stone walls. Now we come to Paul Wright and John 
Coles, guards, and did they guard! Nothing could keep them out of every 
play even after the games. I. P. Pogue. center, a 188-pound streak of light- 
ning, stopped everything that opponents had to offer. 

The undergraduate members of the squad who played very outstanding 
football the past season are: Willie Watt, halfback, a spectacular player from 
all angles: Haywood Robinson, fullback: O. G. Walker, quarterback: Albert 
White, center: Angus Corley, guard: Joseph Carr, end: Eddie Evans, tackle: 
Olin Pearson, guard: Walter Mills, halfback: C, A, Johnson, halfback: and 
Vernon Colbert, halfback. These men are expected to do great things when 
the whistle blows for their participation in anoiher season of man to man 
hard-fighting football. 

The graduating members of the squad will he greatly missed, but the 
golden Bulls will carry on to victory desjiite this handicap and u'lll be praised 
far and wide. 



Page Seventy 



^ ^bt 1936 'Bull 




GIRLS' BASKETBALL 



Sylvia Davis 

BERNICE Bl.AKENEY 

Mary Benton 



Hattih Westbrcok 
Ruth Hillsman 
LaNelle Jackson 



NORENE BAYLESS 

LuciNDA Russell 
Ollie Johnson 



With the assistance of Conch Herbert Penn the young co-eds proved themselves remarkabl: 
in every respect. Since this is the first team composed of girls that Smith has produced, it 
will go down in the history of the institution as one of the greatest achievements in sports. 
Because of a late start and playing only four games this season these young ladies were unable 
to accomplish their desired rank among the winning teams, but the final analysis proved them 
playing lOO'i basketball considering the handicaps which we might say were inevitable. 

Bernice Blakeney. forward, won the admiration of all with her spectacular style of play. 
Sylvia Davis, forward, will long be remembered for her accuracy in shooting. Ruth HiUsman. 
forward, played a very unique style of basketball. Captain Benton at guard was very out- 
standing and as recorded no points were made over her. Norene Baylcss, another guard, won 
the admiration of all by playing real basketball. LaNelle Jackson, guard: Hattie Westbrook, 
guard. Lucinda Russell, guard, and Ollie Johnson, forward, also played a very outstanding 
game of basketball. 



Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 



GAMES PLAYED 

12 Barber-Scotia Junior College 39 

7 Winston-Salem Teachers' College 2 3 

7 Favettevillc State Normal 2 7 

... 12 Fayetteville State Normal 1 '' 



Page Seventy-one 



L. iLbt 1936 IBull A 




BASKETBALL 



LovETTE Warner 
Peyton Manning 
Hubert Eaton. Captain 
Walter Hardy 

WlNTHROP BOUI.WARE 



Claude Walker 
Willie Watt 
Vernon Colbert 
Coach Penn 
REtwNALD Hutchinson 



Douglas C. Green 



Basketball competition as a whole was more evenly balanced as Smith won cighf and lost 
ei^ht this season. The style of offensive play was skillful and interesting. The defense was 
an assigned man-to man in the main. In view of the comparatively recent changes to include 
the three-second rule, the writer believes that Smith successfully evaded the area outscoring 
their opponents 605 points to 585 points. 

Smith apparently had a "second half ' rushing out on the court after tile "hall" giving a 
splendid exhibition of morals and comeback after a first hall slump usually to win or lose by a 
two or three-point margin. 

Individually. "Wee" Willie Watt at forward led the offense and the defense by running 
up a spectacular total of 65 field goals and 1^ free throws. Captain liaton at forward and 
playing his last year possessed fine ability, spirit, and cooperation which will be missed next 
year. Manning at center displayed rare ability to make a regular berth on this 
year's squad. Boulwarcs alternative play at guard and forward presented the team with lock, 
stock, and barrel, for guarding ability and offensive drive. Other players of marked ability 
were Hutchinson, guard, with a very uniciue style of play: Hardy, a lad with a very spectacular 
one hand shot; Walker, with a "point": Warner, alternative center, with a roving disposition: 
and Colbert with ambition. D. C. Greene, guard, graduated at mid term but left a record 
competing wilh the highest. 



I'aqe ScVenly-tL 



^ C&e 1936 TBull Jl 












TENNIS TRAM 

Due mainly to the sterling playing of Harmon Fitch and Hubert Caton. 
the Smith racquet wielders have dominated intercollegiate play during the past 
two years. Harmon W. Fitch, ranked second nationally in 193S, has been 
C. I. A. A. Singles and Doubles Champion, as well as Intercollegiate Champion 
for the last two years. Hubert A. Eaton, former National Junior Champion, 
has been a member of the C. I. A. A. Doubles Championship team two years 
in succession. C. E. Morrison. H. C. Dugas. Frank C. Creft, R. T. Young, 
O. G. Walker, Willie Watt, and others are members of the varsity squad ( the 
first two being lettermen ) , and offer real promise in future collegiate com- 
petition. X. 



Page Seventy-three 



SUNSET 

Sinking, slowly, and resentfully it goes. 

Trying to cast a last unfading impression. 

Trying to make believe that all is as it were. 

But knowing that each moment it is being 

Drawn and choked to its daily death by this rising, visible. 

But ungraspable enemy. 

The one going down has fought hard and lost. 

The sun. 
The one rising has fought harder and won. 

The dusk. 

— Clifton H.-\\vtiiorni-. Class of '31 



INDIAN SUMMER 

Pale moonlight falls upon 
The frost-bitten faces 
Of a thousand golden leaves 
A thousand golden leaves 
That fluttered so blithely 
In the sunshine of a yesterday 
A thousand golden leaves — 
Whose radiance made glad 
The heart of you. 

- -MosL.s Blair. Class uf 'i6. 




FEATURES 



L €bc 1936 IBuW A 




iV/iss Ji)hnson C. Smtlh' 
MARV H. SriNSON 



"Most Allradive" 

Dorothy Dushnbury 



"Miisl Popular" 
Richard Richardson 



Pacie SeCenly-six 



tiri)t 1936 TBull 




"Best Dressfd" 

Otis Davenport 

"A/os( Personality" 

Isaiah P. Pogue 



"Best Physique" 

Peyton Manning 



"Best Looking" 

Francena Clarkson 



"Most Handsome" 

Robert l. Hardin 



"Most Friendly" 
NORENE BAYLESS 



Page Seventy-seven 



1936 T5U1I 




■liesl-AU'Ruund Sludi'nl' 

CHARLES E. Gri-;i.ni.i;i-: 



"Most Popular" 
Gr-NHVA Plair 



■■A/<j.sf Po.sW 

Makv CoLi-s Shaw 



"Most Studious" 
CHCbLIA TOATLliV 



"Must Sennas ■ 

Jami:;s Gaui.di n 



liesl AU-Round Athlete" 

Willie Watt 



Page Seventy-eight 



L Cf)e 1936 T5uU A 




Page Seventy nine 



'L^uU A 




Page Eighty 



^ C6e 1936 T5un 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

The Staff wishes to express its appreciation to: 
Dr. H. L. McCrorey. who has been of great aid to us in our 
planning for the finance of the BULL. 

The members of the former 1936 BULL Staff who laid the 
foundation for the publication of this the fifth volume of the BULL. 

The Observer Printing House. Inc., Charlotte. N. C. for 
the generous cooperation it has been to the Editor and the Business 
Manager. 

The Carolina Studio. Charlotte, N. C. for the very best 
service possible by a photographing concern. 

The Charlotte Engraving Company. Charlotte, N. C, for 
their generous cooperation and helpful suggestions. 

Mr. H. C. Dugas. bursar of the University, for his unselfish 
service in keeping our financial tabulations. 

Mr. Moses Belton and Mr. Moses Blair, seniors of the theo- 
logical and liberal arts schools respectively, who so generously aided 
the Literary Editor. 

Professor Bertram Woodruff and Professor William C. 
Donnell, faculty advisers, whose advice has brought us through 
many difficulties. 

And to our ADVERTISERS, who to a very large degree have made 
this book possible. 



Page Eighty-one 



L Cfte 1936 15uU 




Page Eighlii-lico 



L Ct)C 1936 151111 A 



ECONOMIZING WITH ELECTRICITY 

Intelligent and progressive housewives are not only relieving 
themselves of household and kitchen drudgery and making their 
homes healthier and brighter, and happier, but they are actually 
and substantially reducing their household budgets through the 
wise application of electricity to household duties. 

Take the two all important matters of cooking and refrigera- 
tion for instance. With all of its advantages of coolness, con- 
venience, the saving of time and labor, and other advantages, 
electric cookery costs no more than the old fashioned ways. And 
electric refrigeration, with all of its advantages over ordinary 
refrigeration, actually costs less — much less. 

Equally important, however, are the small household appli- 
ances — the vacuum cleaner, coffee percolator, the smoothing iron, 
washing and iron machines, the mi.xmaster and others. These 
appliances make housework easier. More than that they actually 
add to the comfort and joy of living. 

The cost of electric service has had a constant trend down- 
ward since the power industry came into being. The cost of ///•- 
i)i!j has substaritiallu iiicfeased duriny the past two years. The 
cost of electric serrice /(o.s- co)it'nnted to decrease. 



DUKE POWER COMPANY 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



I'agc Eighty four 



Cbc 1936 13uII 



CLOTHING OF 
DISTINCTION 



Finest Quality .ind 
authentic style char 
acterize Suits. Hats. 
Furnishings H Shoes 
from MelLON'S. 



Mellon's 



Co)iiplii}ieiits of 

Heath Motor Co. 

428 West Trade Street 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Morris & Barnes, Inc. 

Market of Quality 

SPECIALTIES 



Br 



ul I.i 



Ciilf Sweet 

TuiiKUe, Tiipe. Pickled Pigs Feet, Game 
in Season, Choice Western Meats, Fish 
anil Oysters, Dressed Poultry, All Kinds 
of Sausage, Full Line of Delicatessen. 



Dial 3-1116 



227 W. Trade St. 



Travel by Motor 
Coach 

low fares— conven- 
ient SCHEDULES 



MODERN EQUIPMENT 
CAREFUL DRIVERS 



Charter Coaches Ererijwhere 

Queen City Coach 
Company 

Charlotte, N. C. 
Phone 5813 417 W. 5th St. 



STEINWA^ 


AND SONS 


And Other 


Fine Pianos 


"Ercrythiinj Musical" 


Andrews 


Music Co. 


Est. 1892 


231 N. Tryon St. 



o Remember . . . 
Ydu Alwayti Sare At 

BELK 
BROTHERS 

•Charlotte's Hume of Better 
Values" 



Page Eightuhi 



L Cbc 1936 'Bull A 




Get This Picture Firmly 
Fixed In Your Mind 

This IS the store ni Chailuttc that carries 
,ver J50 brands ot natiuiially known and 
lationallv advertised merchandise. 




CHARLOTTE, N.C. 



CoDijjttDwnts of 

Hardaway-Hecht Go. 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 



CuiiiiAinienta of 

McDonald Service 
Company 

Firestone Products 



Bread Cake 

MERITA 

Baked-In Flavor Bread 

Cakes Made with Fresh Eggs, 
Milk and Butter 

American Bakeries 
Company 

l.ilU West Trade Street 



Compliments of 

Southern Hardware 

Charlotte, N. C. 



M. B. Smith Jewelers, 
Incorporated - 

105 East Trade Street 

Dial 7361 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



It'll Easy to Pay the Haverty Way 

Everything for the Home 

No Interest — No Carrying Charge 




221 \. Trvon Street 



Page Eighty-six 



L ^bt 1936 15ull ^ 



A PURE DRINK 


_____^ 




OF 

NATURAL FLAVORS 


CmM 




Every Bottle Sterilized 


■: Delicious and Refreshing 









GARRISON & HOPKINS COMPANY 

I.NCDKl'llNAiKI) 1VJ_' 

A Complete Plumbing and Heating Service 
1501 South Tryon Street 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Specialties 
Sheet Metal Work 
Air-Condi tioning 
Automatic Stokers 



Heat By 
Vapor, Steam, 
Areola, Warm Air, 
Hot Water 



Palmar Printing Olompang 

Quality Printing 

TELEPHONE 3-444G 210 E. FIFTH ST. 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



SYMBOL OF THE WORLD'S 



FOREMOST 




FOOD 



SERVICE 



Page Eighty-ieven 



L ^be 1936 15UI1 



A Traveling- Bag Given Away l>y Courtesy of 

KAY JEWELRY COMPANY 

"LIkij 0)1 Our EciKj/ Tcrni!'" 
Diamonds — Watches — Radios — Jewelry 



105 South Trvon Street 



CharUitte, North Carolina 



Floor Wax, Mops, Brocms, Disinfectants and Soaps 

CHARLOTTE HARDWARE CO. 



POUND AND MOORE COMPANY 

Conniurcial Sfatidiicis, Office Equipinvut 

South Trvon St. Charlotte, N. C. 



coMriJMExrs OF 




RELIABLE LOAN COMPANY 




(hurloUf'a Oldfsl Paicn Shup 




lO'l i;,iM 1 r.idc SlrL'Lt Ch.irlotlo. \ 


c 



PYRAMID CHEVROLET COMPANY 



581 E. Trade Street 



Ciiarlotte, N. C. 





COMPLIMENTS t)F 




C. D. KENNY COMPANY 




TKAS, COFFEES, SU(;ARS 


:i() i;.i 


si 7ih Sltiil C:h.ulolti\ Xorlll Clroliil.l 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

WEARN LUMBER COMPANY 



1420 South Mint Street 



Charlotte, Noith Carolina 



Payi- Highly eight 



mbe 1936 Teull 



J. O. JONES, INC. 

HART SHAFFNER & MARX 
FINE CLOTHES 

$30.00 and UP 

J. O. JONES, INC. 



Co}iipliiiievt!i of 


Southern Fruit Co., 
Inc. 


Johber.s of Fruit:^ and 
Vegetables 


Phone 3-6181 



Five Point Gleaners 

The Home of 
VORC'LONE CEANING 

Dial 948J 
W. L. Sullivan, Maim go- 



T. J. Wiggins Lumber 
Company 

Will Finnish All Materials to 

Build Your Home and Waif 

oil Building and Loan or 

F. H. A. Loan 

Phone 5129 

253 East Bland Street 

Ltuiihty — and Everything ii) 

fiiiilding .?'(/)/)/;>.<; 



Compliiiientx of 

J. B. IVEY & GO. 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Cniiiplinients nf 

Ross Electric Go. 

505 E. Trade St. Charlotte, N. C. 
Dial 2-3604 



Co,„pli,„r,it^ of 

Underwood-Elliott 
Fisher Go. 

127 West Fourth Street 
A. F. Dancy 
Phone 3-6156 



H. V. Johnson & Son 

To Provide You with Economical 
Heat 

Goal — Goke 

Telephone 3-2187 



Page Eighty-ninc 



L Cf)C 1936 13UI1 



"we:ar clean clothes" 



HAVE THEM DRY CLEANED 
REGULARLY 

"Over Forty Y'ears of Srrt-icc 
for Smith" 

DIAL 3-5191 

E Second Street 



ESTABLISHeO 1090 



SOUTHEASTERN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY 

2 1 8 West Second Street 

We have consi "cted the following bii. ■■gs at t.')hnson C. 
Smith University : 



Berry Hall 

Smith Theological normitory 

Science Hall 

Refectory 



F'rinting Plant 

Three Residences for Faculty 

(iymnasium 

The I'niversity Chapel 



l.oui8 (^. Eatcliffe, inc. 

The Universitu F'^'ist 

43 1 South Tr>' street 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Compliments 

James P. Ghorgf, 
University Cleaners 

■EVHRY MAN A SUIT" 



J. E. HEMPHILL 

Utficial Photographer 
ANNUALS A SPECIALTY 

Carolina Studio 

5 161, North McDowell St. 

CHARLOTTE. N. C. 

Phone 865 1 



Page Ntneti) 




ACfrillWIEMEMiniN AM^XIINIE 



MM^imm'^mi ipimidie ■* -, .. 






iief'ofinEKl&'W 






nr ■' G++AR.LOTTE 

M ' ' --, •^NOR.T tt ' 

~" ' ' NINETEEN FIFTEEN ■'■''- /^ 





Organization 

Prepared to serve the 
most exacting annual staff. 
An organization with a thor- 
ough knowledge of printing and 
binding achieved through years 
of experience In the production of 
college and high school annuals . . . 

Observer Printing House 

CHARLOTTE N.C. stj^wa^'^ag^si^ 

EITABLISHED 1895 «••*»»«»«»